Jeffreys Bay (J-Bay)

Jeffreys Bay, in the Eastern Cape Province sits a short distance from the most southerly point along this coast at Cape St Francis. The vast golden sand beach here runs for miles along the warm, emerald waters of the Indian Ocean.

There is so much to do, as Jeffreys Bay is one of the world’s most famous (and best) surfing locations. Primarily known for its long, powerful point break the waves here break over several different sections, all with their own names such as Boneyards, Impossibles and Kitchen Windows. The best-known section though, is Supertubes which can give rides of over 300 metres and hold waves up to 20 feet.

Along with the reputation for great surf J-Bay also has some notoriety regarding shark attacks. In fact, back in 2015 during a world championship surf contest had to be called off when one of the surfers was attacked by a great white shark.

For those looking for a less adrenaline-fueled beach activity, you can enjoy hunting for shells as this beach has some of the most diverse varieties of shells in the world. In fact, the nearby Shell Museum displays samples of what South Africa has to offer.

There is plenty to do off the beach, as you can go hiking and walking to see the stunning scenery surrounding this location. There are also fun water parks and shopping in town, and there is a wide range of hotels from backpacker’s lodges to luxury style.

When you visit Jeffreys Bay, you will never run out of things to do. Whether you want to relax on the beach, watch the surfers, or spend time in town, there is plenty to do. Some of the wildest beaches in South Africa are right here, and it is truly an amazing place to visit.

Nearest town/city

Jeffrey’s Bay

Also known as:

J-Bay

Activities

  • Surfing

Facilities

  • Cafe/restaurant

Awards

Blue Flag Award

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More Eastern Cape beaches in South Africa

Current weather (Mon Oct 19th 16:00)

Partly cloudy

(Partly cloudy)
17°C / 63°F

Sea temperature
18.2°C
64.7°F

Jeffreys BayFull weather & tide times info »

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